Waterloo Region Free Christmas Dinners (2018)

Even if Mr Ford hadn’t decided to put a stop to the $15 dollar minimum wage, it wouldn’t have raised minimum wage earners above the Low Income Cutoff (LICO) for Waterloo Region. Although we’re told we ‘recovered’ from the recession of 2008, Canadians earning minimum wage nearly doubled (from 6% – 10%) between 2017 and 2018.  Minimum wage jobs don’t just have low pay, very often they are for precarious work.

Although Waterloo Region is a rich community, many members of our community are financially strained during the holiday season.  (And for the rest of the year, too.)

MYTH: Poverty is not an issue in Waterloo Region. More than 1 in 10 people in Waterloo Region live in poverty. REALITY: Although Waterloo Region is a great place to work, live and play, poverty is an issue in our community. In 2006, approximately 10.2 per cent of residents (48,000 people) in Waterloo Region were living with low income. Imagine - you could fill the Kitchener Memorial Auditorium seven times with this many people! Did you know... • 12.2% or 13,750 children 0 to 17 years in Waterloo Region are living in low income.2 • 451,411 meals were served in 2011 through meal programs throughout Cambridge, Kitchener and Waterloo.3 • In May 2013, there were 8,727 cases on the Ontario Works (OW) caseload. This is a 39% increase in the caseload from September 2008.
2013 Poverty Myth Busters for Waterloo Region (page 3)
Download the PDF

That’s why the Green Party supports raising the minimum wage to a living wage, and implementing a Guaranteed Livable Income (universal basic income set at 10% above LICO).    You can find out more about Basic Income from our friends at Basic Income Waterloo.

Unfortunately that’s not going to happen until we start electing more Greens.  In the meantime, people are living in poverty and Christmas is coming.

The following is a list of free Waterloo Region Christmas Dinner options for people in need.  If you (or anyone you know) is in need of a good dinner over the holidays, please share.  (And if you’re able I imagine these organizations would welcome volunteers.)

I’m not sure who originated this list (I received as a paper handout), but most of the dinner locations listed here are for the City of Kitchener.  If you know of any others in the rest of the region– Cambridge, Waterloo or the Townships, please share and I’ll add them to the list.

Friday December 14th, 2018

Trinity United Church – Christmas Dinner Community Can Dine – Elmira, Ontario
6:00pm-7:30pm
21 Arthur St. N., Elmira Ontario

Saturday, December 15th, 2018

Stirling Avenue Mennonite Church – Regular Saturday Supper
open 5:00pm-8:00pm – Supper served 5:30-7:30pm
57 Stirling Avenue North, Kitchener

Sunday, December 16th, 2018

KCI Christmas Dinner
10:45am – 1:30pm

787 King Street W., Kitchener (enter off King Street)
Tickets available at St. John’s Kitchen or St Mark’s Church
(Limited tickets available last week of November and first week of December)

Thursday December 20th, 2018

St. John’s Kitchen – Festive Dinner
11:30am to 1:00pm
97 Victoria Street North, Kitchener

Friday December 21st, 2018

St. John’s Kitchen – Regular Hours
11:30am to 1:00pm
97 Victoria Street North, Kitchener

Saturday December 22nd, 2018

Stirling Avenue Mennonite Church – Regular Saturday Supper – open 5:00pm-8:00pm
Supper served 5:30-7:30pm
57 Stirling Avenue North, Kitchener

Sunday December 23rd, 2018

Caper’s Sports Bar – Christmas Dinner
Noon – 3:00pm
1 Queen Street North, Kitchener
*Toy and Clothing giveaway

Monday December 24th, 2018

St. John’s Kitchen – Festive Dinner
11:30am to 1:00pm
Meal by St Vincent de Paul
97 Victoria Street North, Kitchener

Ray of Hope – Festive Dinner
7:00pm-8:30pm
659 King Street East, (Back Door) Kitchener

Tuesday December 25th, 2018

St. John’s Kitchen – Christmas Dinner by Friends of St John’s Kitchen
11:30am to 1:00pm
97 Victoria Street North, Kitchener

Ray of Hope – Regular Dinner
7:00pm-8:30pm
659 King Street East, (Back Door) Kitchener

Wednesday, December 26th, 2018

First United Church Christmas Buffet
11:30am-1pm
16 William Street, Waterloo

Thursday, December 27th, 2018

St. John’s Kitchen – Festive Dinner
11:30am to 1:00pm
97 Victoria Street North, Kitchener

Friday, December 28th, 2018

St. John’s Kitchen – Festive Dinner
11:30am to 1:00pm
97 Victoria Street North, Kitchener

Saturday, December 29th, 2018

Stirling Avenue Mennonite Church – Regular Saturday Supper
open 5:00pm-8:00pm – Supper served 5:30-7:30pm
57 Stirling Avenue North, Kitchener

Sunday December 30th, 2018

Ray of Hope – Lunch
Noon-1:30pm
659 King Street East, (Back Door) Kitchener

Monday, December 31, 2018

St. John’s Kitchen – Regular Hours
11:30am to 1:00pm
97 Victoria Street North, Kitchener

Tuesday, January 1st, 2018

St. John’s Kitchen CLOSED

Wednesday, January 2nd, 2018

St. John’s Kitchen – Regular Hours
11:30am to 1:00pm
97 Victoria Street North, Kitchener


[republished from the KitConGreens Blog]

A made-in-Ontario Climate Change Plan

Liberal MPs Marwan Tabbara, Bardish Chagger, Raj Saini, Bryan May and Conservative MP Harold Albrecht
Liberal MPs Marwan Tabbara, Bardish Chagger, Raj Saini, Bryan May and Conservative MP Harold Albrecht  Waterloo Region Climate Change Consultation, Kitchener, 2016

When I attended the Kitchener Climate Change Consultation in 2016 it was incredible to see all 5 Waterloo Region MPs in attendance, not just the 4 new Liberal MPs, but my own Conservative MP Harold Albrecht was there too.

Facilitator David Weber

Unsurprisingly 3 of our WRGreen candidates were there helping facilitate the discussions.

I believe our Kitchener Climate Consultation was the biggest one held across Canada.  It had more than a full slate of MPs, there were hundreds of engaged citizens there to participate.

There was a lot of great discussion and valuable input as citizens brainstormed ways we could come together and bring Climate Change to heel.

Facilitator Stacey Danckert

It was a heady time.  Critical thinking and creativity came together as citizens from across the political spectrum contributed different pieces of the solution to Climate Change, the existential global crisis of our time.

But Waterloo Region was up for it. We were ready.

Each round table discussion yielded up a blueprint of action.  And at the end of the day, each table’s facilitators presented a verbal report of the high points to the entire assembly.

Although all 5 Waterloo Region MPs were there, its pretty clear none of them actually listened.

Former Progressive Conservative Party Leader Patrick Brown had had a fully costed moderate election platform complete with carbon tax.  But it seems the PC Party backroom boys weren’t ready for a carbon tax, so Mr Brown and his platform were replaced with Mr Ford and a series of off-the-cuff promises masquerading as a platform.

One of the huge costs associated with winner-take-all politics is the policy lurch that happens when a centrist party is replaced by a right wing party.  Which is exactly what we’re seeing here in Ontario.

But even before winning the leadership or the election, one thing Doug Ford was *always* clear about was his intention to get rid of the Liberal’s Cap & Trade carbon mitigation system.

CARBON PRICING

With Climate Change breathing down our necks, carbon pricing is intended to disincentivise Green House Gas emissions.  It does this by forcing polluters to take financial responsibility for the pollution they generate.

Cap and Trade revenue flowing into Government coffers is supposed to help government finance our necessary transition to a sustainable economy.

While it is clear that carbon pricing is imperative, personally, I am not at all unhappy to see the dismantling of the McGuinty-Wynne Cap and Trade system, although a more orderly change would have been nice.

One big problem with Ontario’s Cap and Trade was that its carbon targets simply weren’t anywhere close to being high enough.

Another was that as many as 100 of the worst corporate polluters were exempted.

From my perspective, the worst thing about Cap and Trade is that it creates a government revenue stream.   Governments get very attached to revenue streams.   And the Ontario Liberals had made good use of the Cap and Trade funds that flowed into government coffers.

What do schools have to do with Carbon Pricing?

Ontario schools have been struggling since the 1990’s when the Mike Harris Sr government diverted education tax funds from community school boards into the general government coffers.  Now, instead of dispensing all the funds collected for Ontario elementary and high school education through property tax directly to the schools, in the name of “efficiency” education funding was suddenly dependent on a “funding formula” that was more about redistributing education tax than educating our kids.

Government works in mysterious ways… instead of fixing this elementary school, they built a new one.

Suddenly there wasn’t enough money in the Education budget for elementary school music class and librarians.  In the rich province of Ontario, school budgets were reduced the bare minimum to function.  Chronic underfunding begun by the Mike Harris Sr PC government and carried on by the McGuinty-Wynne Liberals  over decades naturally meant there was never enough funding to properly maintain the infrastructure.

But when school buildings began to crumble across the province, the Liberals had to do something: and so some of the Cap and Trade revenue was earmarked to fix our schools.   (Although spun in the media as needed repairs, in truth these funds were supposed to be used to retrofit schools to make them more energy efficient.)     Sadly even that is gone now, and the folks at http://fixourschools.ca/ will tell you that Ontario schools still need a whole lot of fixing.

Federal Backstop Carbon Pricing

Canadians for Carbon Dividends Ontario Chart

But Ontario’s carbon pricing void will presently be filled with a different kind of carbon pricing, as the Federal Government implements a Carbon Fee and Dividend regime.

This is the carbon pricing policy advocated by both federal and Provincial Green Parties in Canada because it is a much more equitable system.

The fees collected from industry polluters don’t go to line government coffers, but are instead payed out directly to citizens to help us weather the transition.

The dividends counter the price increases industry will pass on to consumers.  The way it works out is that consumers with the smallest carbon footprint actually come out ahead.

Even so, it still is not enough.

The IPCC Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has made it clear that we aren’t doing nearly enough to address Climate Change.  They’ve given us a timeline of 12 years, and time is running out.

While we need to get the new federal Carbon Pricing system up and running, it is only the start.

So it is a very good thing Ontario’s Doug Ford PC Government has stepped up and is conducting its own

Consultation: A made-in-Ontario climate change plan

We never know if our winner-take-all governments will listen, but when they ask us for input on important issues, it is well worth responding.  Even if they ignore what we have to say, at least we will be on the record.  And the record will be there for the next government.

It is very important for us to respond, to make sure our new PC Government understands Ontario expects serious climate change policy.

This consultation tells us they want our opinions, but they don’t want our names. The only way to participate is to do so anonymously on a web form.

Tips

Your submission does not need to be a scholarly work; you can write as much or as little as you’re comfortable with.  When filling in any kind of web form, it’s easiest to prepare your answer offline.  That way you won’t accidentally send it before you’re finished, and you can keep a copy of the submission you wrote.  It is always an excellent idea to make as much noise as we can publicly online.  If you have a blog, share it there and/or sharing on twitter or Facebook or whatever other social media you use.   Sharing online can inspire others to participate, and the greater the response the consultation gets, the better.  If you don’t have a place to share online, feel free to share your submission with us, and we’ll publish it here on the blog.

You might find inspiration in the  Rise For Climate Waterloo Region submission or suggestions made at the Federal Climate Change Consultation.  

About this consultation

Our quality of life depends on clean air to breathe, safe water to drink, and well-protected lands and parks.

Later this fall, Ontario will release a plan that will identify specific areas of focus to help us tackle and be more resilient to climate change.

This will be the first part of a broader approach that will protect clean air and water, encourage conservation and do more to address urban litter and waste.

This made-in-Ontario solution will strike the right balance between protecting our environment and responsibly supporting a prosperous economy.

Areas of focus

The plan will include several areas of focus, such as:

  • Creating an understanding of the effects that climate change is having on our households, businesses, communities and public infrastructure to better prepare and strengthen our resiliency.
  • Ensuring polluters are held accountable and creating dedicated measures that will efficiently reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Improving Ontario’s business climate by unlocking the power of the private sector to finance and drive innovative climate solutions. This will include an emissions-reduction fund to invest in technology-based and other solutions to reduce emissions in Ontario.
  • Finding a balanced solution that puts people first, makes life more affordable for families, and takes Ontario’s role in fighting climate change seriously.

These areas will help ensure our investments in climate action effectively balance greenhouse gas reductions while supporting economic prosperity and Ontario families.

https://www.ontario.ca/form/tell-us-your-ideas-climate-change?

⇒ Ontario Climate Consultation webform

Survey Results – Candidates seeking Regional Chair position in WR

Candidates for Regional Chair, Waterloo Region

Cities and regions around the globe are taking the myriad threats of climate change VERY seriously, and many are taking active steps to ‘future proof’ their communities. We are already seeing the impacts in our own backyards – and we know that decisions will need to be made today to address tomorrow’s looming climate dangers. On behalf of Region residents and voters concerned with the devastating impacts of climate change felt right here in the Region of Waterloo and across our warming planet, we asked candidates seeking office in the Region of Waterloo to review and reply to a survey questions.

The answers from all 4 candidates seeking Regional Chair position are posted HERE.

 

The UN’s 1.5°C special climate report at a glance

[Guest Post by Emil Jeyaratnam, Madeleine De Gabriele, and Michael Hopkin, originally published in The Conversation]

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released a special report today on the impacts of global warming of 1.5℃ above pre-industrial levels.

The report outlines the considerable challenges of meeting the Paris Agreement’s more ambitious goal of limiting warming to 1.5℃, the global effort needed to achieve the target, and the consequences of not.

The highlights of the report are presented below:


infographic Graph: TITLE Global warming projections for 2100 | Emissions and expected warming based in pledges and current policies | Y-Axis Global greenhouse gas emmissions GtCO2e/year | 150 - Warming projected by 2100 | 100 - Baseline 4.1 - 4.8°C | 50 - Current policies 3.1 - 3.7°C | - Pledges 2.6 - 3.2°C | 0 - 2°C consistent 1.5 - 1.7°C | -50 - 1.5°C consistent 1.3 - 1.5°C -50 | X-Axis 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 2040 2050 2060 2070 2080 2090 2100 | source: Climate Action Tracker | Text: The world will need ti be carbon-neutral by 2047 to give us a 66% chance of hitting the 1.5°C target, or by 2058 for a 50% chance. If the world was carbon neutral by: • 2047: we have a 66% chance of limiting warming to 1.5°C •2058: we have a 50% chance of limiting waeming to 1.5°C This will mean • sourcing 70 - 86% of electricity from renewables by 2050 • putting a price on greenhouse emissions • using technology to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. GRAPH: Renewable energy targets | Proportion of global renewable energy consumption in 2015* = 18% | Global Target by 2050: 70 - 85% of electricity supplied by renewables | Australia: Australia's target for 2020: 23% | Labor's Target for 2030: 50% | souce: The World Bank | Text: The world has had about 1°C of warming so far. at 1.5°C we will see: • more heatwaves, floods and droughts • up to 90% of reef corals lost • damage to crops and fisheries • threats to economic growth | images: forest fire, flooded settlement, dead coral, dustbowl farmer's field | Text: But by avoiding 2°C of global warming, we will: • protect 10.4m people from sea level rise • halve the number of people without fresh water • reduce death and disease from heatwaves. • make it easier to deliver many of the UN's Sustainable Development GoalsCC BY-ND


Correction: A previous version of this article stated that the Australian Labor Party had a goal of reaching 50% renewable energy by 2050. But the ALP hope to achieve the 50% target via an emissions intensity scheme by 2030.

Emil Jeyaratnam, Multimedia Editor, The Conversation;
Madeleine De Gabriele, Deputy Editor: Energy + Environment, The Conversation, and
Michael Hopkin, Section Editor: Energy + Environment, The Conversation

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives 4.0 License. Read the original article.

Find the ipcc (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) report Global Warming of 1.5 °C ~ an IPCC special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, in the context of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change, sustainable development, and efforts to eradicate poverty

“Global Greenhouse Gas Emmission Trajectories” graphic by Laurel L. Russwurm based on “The UN’s 1.5°C special climate report at a glance” released under a Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives 4.0 License

And Then There Were 10: New Brunswick Grows Greener

When I think back to the 2008 Election when the Federal Greens earned nearly 1 million votes but won no seats at all, it is really pretty amazing.  Elizabeth May only became the first elected Canadian Green in 2011.  She was followed by Andrew Weaver, elected in the 2013 provincial election as the first Green Party MLA in British Columbia’s history. In 2014, David Coon made history with a seat for the New Brunswick Green Party.  Next PEI Green Party Leader Peter Bevan Baker was tenth time lucky when he won his seat in 2015.  In 2017 when BC’s Andrew Weaver was re-elected, he was accompanied by two new Green MLAs, Adam Olsen, Saanich North and the Islands MLA and Sonia Furstenau, Cowichan Valley MLA.  Then, near the end of 2017, the PEI Greens Caucus was formed by Hannah Bell’s stunning by-election win.  And of course this year our own awesome Green Party of Ontario leader, Mike Schreiner, won his seat in Guelph.

Meanwhile, the PEI Greens were polling ridiculously well in January, of this year, and then even better in August.  Must have something to do with the way Greens do politics differently.

Last Night New Brunswick re-elected Green Party Leader David Coon, as well as two new Green Members of the Legislative Assembly. The new MLAs are Megan Mitton, who won her riding of Memramcook-Tantramar by 11 votes, and Kevin Arseneau elected in the riding of Kent North.

 

Congratulations @DavidCCoon@meganmitton and @kevinarseneau.

One thing I can promise: it’s not over yet.

Join us for the RISE for CLIMATE rally at Waterloo Square this Saturday, September 8th 2018, 4:30pm

Note that this is not a Green Party event, although Green Party members are encouraged to attend

Sept 8 | Rise For Climate
This Saturday, as part of the international Rise for Climate movement, thousands of rallies and other events will be held in cities and towns around the world. Our local rally will be held in Waterloo Square, this Saturday, 8 September 2018 at 4:30pm. Join us for art creation and some pre-rally street theatre starting at 3:00pm.

There’s an important new message in these events — “a fast and fair transition to 100% renewable energy for all”, holding together themes of climate, jobs and justice.

Progress toward a more stable climate requires justice for all people – those impacted by the damages of climate chaos, and those who’s communities and jobs will have to change in the shift from fossil fuels.

The Rise for Climate rally is an excellent opportunity to learn more about strategies for a “just transition,” to connect with an increasingly diverse coalition of climate activists, and to voice your call for our region, province and country to move quickly in addressing the climate crisis.

RSVP at Rise for Climate, Jobs, and Justice Waterloo Region for more event details.

Partnering with

See you there!

Divest Waterloo

Thank you for your ongoing support for Divest Waterloo and for your part in our collective action to raise awareness and engage our community on issues related to climate change, our pursuit of a low carbon economy, and our movement towards a just and sustainable future.

Mirrored from: Join us for the RISE for CLIMATE rally at Waterloo Square this Saturday, September 8th, 4:30pm | Mailchimp

Join us at the Kultrún World Music Festival this weekend!

Visit the WRGreens booth to say hi and chat about green issues, where we’ll have a button making table for kids of all ages!

But of course the real point of it all is the music!  We’re looking forward to hearing indie Juno nominee Alysha Brilla (pictured below with Bob after her performance at the GPO Earth Day Rally.
For a taste of the program check out the promo:

Hope to see you there!

Photos from the Peoples Town Hall

Although the Hon. Bardish Chagger declined to attend (citing not enough notice) Waterloo Region’s 3 backbench Liberals were there.

Naturally Greens were out for this.

Of course there were questions from the audience.

But questions were limited because the MPs time was limited: none of them had real answers, and all three had other places to go.

After they were gone, there was some good discussion about the way forward.


More photos from the event are in the Peoples Town Hall KM Flickr album

Pipeline Town Hall Wednesday Night!

RSVP http://act.350.org/event/screenings-town-halls-km-buyout/14413/signup/

Community members are invited to discuss the Canadian government’s buyout of Kinder Morgan’s pipeline and tanker project with local members of Parliament.

Excerpts of the film Directly Affected: Pipeline Under Pressure will be screened.

Following the film, Rev. Rosalyn Kantaht’nta Elm (Oneida Nation, and a priest serving the Anglican parish of Six Nations) will join Chief Myeengun Henry (Chippewas of the Thames) and Dr. Angela Carter (BSIA Fellow and Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at UW) to reflect on the film and lead a discussion.

Doors open at 5:30, plan to arrive by 5:45 to enjoy some snacks and find a seat. This event is free, with donations accepted to help cover the costs of the venue.

WRGreens at Kultrún World Music Festival


This year we’re looking forward to having our very first Waterloo Region Greens information booth at KULTRÚN.

The local World Music festival created by Neruda Arts began in Waterloo Square but quickly outgrew the space so they moved to Victoria Park.  Kultrún always has a stunning mix of great music from around the world.  (That’s where I became a fan of the Jerry Cans last year).  Victoria Park has room for two full size stages, one by the Clocktower and the other down by the water. This lets them squeeze in even more music, with stage crews setting up one stage while the music flows on the other. It also keeps the audience moving back and forth, handy for an event dubbed “KW’s largest outdoor dance party.”

The Festival actually begins with a special Friday Afternoon event at 2:00pm
The Conversation: The Condor and The Eagle Prophecy at Open Sesame
Although this event is free, space is limited, so you must register.

The 8pm, Friday July 13th, 2018
GALA: Morena Son from Cuba, Aurora & Mateo and Dj Fosforita
at The MUSEUM on Friday Night.
[The only Kultrún event with an admission fee.  Advance tickets: $45.00; Table of 10 $400.00]

Saturday July 14th

  • 12:00pm DJ Fosforita (Toronto/Ecuador)
  •   2:00pm Grupo Yautepec (Mexico)
  •   3:00pm Subhira Quartet (Chile)
  •   4:00pm Briga (Montreal/Poland)
  •   5:00pm Maracatu Mar Abeto (Toronto/Brazil)
  •   6:00pm Jeong ga ak hoe (Korea)
  •   7:00pm Eliana Cuevas (Venezuela)
  •   8:00pm Morena Son (Cuba)
  •   9:00pm Four Corners of the World
  •   9:45pm Afrikana Soul Sister (Montreal/Mali)

Sunday July 15th, 2018

  • 1:00pm Cara Loft (First Nations)
  • 2:00pm White Pine Dancers (First Nations)
  • 3:00pm Beatriz Pichi Malen (Indigenous Mapuche)
  • 4:00pm Cascabel (Toronto/Cuba/Mexico/Venezuela)
  • 5:00pm OKAN (Toronto/Cuba)
  • 6:00pm Aurora (Spain)
  • 7:00pm Alysha Brilla (Canada/Tanzania)
  • 8:00pm Colectro  (Colombia)

Victoria Park, Kitchener (MAP)

Pictured on my mini poster are Eliana Cuevas from the 2014 Jazz Festival and Alysha Brilla performing at this year’s Multicultural Festival.  If you haven’t yet been, here’s a taste of what’s in store for you this year:

Hope to see you at Kultrún!


For more information visit the Kultrún website

[republished from the KitConGreens blog]

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