The UN’s 1.5°C special climate report at a glance

[Guest Post by Emil Jeyaratnam, Madeleine De Gabriele, and Michael Hopkin, originally published in The Conversation]

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released a special report today on the impacts of global warming of 1.5℃ above pre-industrial levels.

The report outlines the considerable challenges of meeting the Paris Agreement’s more ambitious goal of limiting warming to 1.5℃, the global effort needed to achieve the target, and the consequences of not.

The highlights of the report are presented below:


infographic Graph: TITLE Global warming projections for 2100 | Emissions and expected warming based in pledges and current policies | Y-Axis Global greenhouse gas emmissions GtCO2e/year | 150 - Warming projected by 2100 | 100 - Baseline 4.1 - 4.8°C | 50 - Current policies 3.1 - 3.7°C | - Pledges 2.6 - 3.2°C | 0 - 2°C consistent 1.5 - 1.7°C | -50 - 1.5°C consistent 1.3 - 1.5°C -50 | X-Axis 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 2040 2050 2060 2070 2080 2090 2100 | source: Climate Action Tracker | Text: The world will need ti be carbon-neutral by 2047 to give us a 66% chance of hitting the 1.5°C target, or by 2058 for a 50% chance. If the world was carbon neutral by: • 2047: we have a 66% chance of limiting warming to 1.5°C •2058: we have a 50% chance of limiting waeming to 1.5°C This will mean • sourcing 70 - 86% of electricity from renewables by 2050 • putting a price on greenhouse emissions • using technology to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. GRAPH: Renewable energy targets | Proportion of global renewable energy consumption in 2015* = 18% | Global Target by 2050: 70 - 85% of electricity supplied by renewables | Australia: Australia's target for 2020: 23% | Labor's Target for 2030: 50% | souce: The World Bank | Text: The world has had about 1°C of warming so far. at 1.5°C we will see: • more heatwaves, floods and droughts • up to 90% of reef corals lost • damage to crops and fisheries • threats to economic growth | images: forest fire, flooded settlement, dead coral, dustbowl farmer's field | Text: But by avoiding 2°C of global warming, we will: • protect 10.4m people from sea level rise • halve the number of people without fresh water • reduce death and disease from heatwaves. • make it easier to deliver many of the UN's Sustainable Development GoalsCC BY-ND


Correction: A previous version of this article stated that the Australian Labor Party had a goal of reaching 50% renewable energy by 2050. But the ALP hope to achieve the 50% target via an emissions intensity scheme by 2030.

Emil Jeyaratnam, Multimedia Editor, The Conversation;
Madeleine De Gabriele, Deputy Editor: Energy + Environment, The Conversation, and
Michael Hopkin, Section Editor: Energy + Environment, The Conversation

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives 4.0 License. Read the original article.

Find the ipcc (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) report Global Warming of 1.5 °C ~ an IPCC special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, in the context of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change, sustainable development, and efforts to eradicate poverty

“Global Greenhouse Gas Emmission Trajectories” graphic by Laurel L. Russwurm based on “The UN’s 1.5°C special climate report at a glance” released under a Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives 4.0 License